How Do I Know if I'm Hungry?

  • posted by Marci Anderson Evans
  • Sunday, August 14, 2016

How do you know you're hungry? I know it sounds like an odd question but I'm always amazed at the answers I get to this seemingly simple question. Think about it a moment. Imagine I just asked you "how do you know you're hungry?" What would you say?  

I talk about hunger a fair amount. Certainly more than the average person since I happen to be a nutrition therapist for a living. :) And perhaps more than other dietitians because I use an intuitive eating approach to my work. That means I work with my clients to help them connect to the process of eating when hungry, stopping when full, and learning to manage their emotions without using food. Perhaps it sounds simple but it can be a surprisingly complex process!

There are many things in life that can derail us from eating in response to a physical cue for hunger: not being able to identify hunger, eating based on the time of day, habits, chaotic schedules, emotions, and even dieting. I'm sure you could add to the list.

In an ideal world, we'd eat in response to a hunger cue the majority of the time. Note: not 100% of the time. Sometimes we eat for fun and social reasons. But hopefully most of our eating is done because our bodies and brains need more fuel. So my purpose in writing this blog post is to help you become more aware of your personal cues of hunger. Believe it or not, your hunger cues are just as individual as you are! And learning your own personal cues for hunger is the first step to eating intuitively.

So, here is your homework assignment. Get out a sheet of paper and write the following:

Starving:
 

Over-hungry:

Meal hungry:

Snack hungry:

Now, I want you to write down as many PHYSICAL descriptors as you can for each category. I'll give you some examples.

Starving: stomach pain, headache, terrible mood, no energy

Over-hungry: growling/empty stomach, shaky, can't think of anything but eating

Meal hungry: grumbly stomach, lack of concentration, low energy, mouth watering at the thought of food

Snack hungry: distracted thinking, energy dip, little grumbles in stomach

Ok, the next step is to keep this paper around for a week or so. Throughout the week pay attention to moments that you think you might be in one of these categories and ask yourself the following questions:

1. Am I hungry?

2. How hungry am I?

3. How do I know? This "how do I know" part is your cue to write down any physical descriptor you have that fits your particular level of hunger.

The last step is extremely important because you are creating an individualized list of how your body speaks to you. Try to pay attention for a week or so and see what data you gather. You might notice that you need to make changes to your list as you go along.

What are your greatest obstacles to eating in response to hunger? I'd love to hear your feedback!

Your nutritionist in Cambridge,

Marci

Healing the Hate: A Better Body Image for 2016

  • posted by Marci Anderson Evans
  • Monday, July 25, 2016

This post originally debuted in January and with the heat of summer upon us I had to re-share it.

Key Point: You cannot talk your way to better body image. If you treat yourself with hate you will continue to feel hate towards your body. In this video blog I share with you the why and the how to improve your body image through actionable steps.

After you view this video blog, I hope you will share what you plan to start doing that feels good to your body. What action step or steps will you start making today?

 


Independence from Our Toxic Food Culture

  • posted by Marci Anderson Evans
  • Sunday, July 03, 2016

In this video blog I talk about how identifying and living from your own food values gives you sanity in an often insane food culture. In the spirit of Independence Day- I invite you to celebrate the fact that you are autonomous and can declare what does and does not work for you and your health. And I discuss why your internal wisdom has more value than all of the opinions or nutrition facts combined. Listen and then share with us your food values!


NEW Online Eating Disorder Training for Dietitians and Dietetic Students

  • posted by Marci Anderson Evans
  • Wednesday, June 01, 2016

 

10% off until August 1st!

 

I am incredibly excited to announce the launch of my Eating Disorders Online Training today!

Whether you’ve been practicing for 20 years, or you’re a dietetic student or intern, the chances are high that you’ve received zero training on how to counsel people with eating disorders. Given that nearly 10% of the US populations falls along the ED spectrum (not to mention subclinical EDs) this is a huge problem!

I am Certified Eating Disorder Dietitian and IAEDP Approved Supervisor. I developed this 5 part series because I know that clients with eating disorders NEED a skilled, confident, and capable dietitian. And the purpose of this 5 part series is to lay the groundwork for you to start to develop the necessary skills to begin working with this population.

You’ll get 7.5 CEUS in this 5 part series during which I’ll cover topics including:

  • Assessment
  • Diagnosis
  • Integrating therapeutic techniques appropriately into nutrition counseling
  • How to effectively communicate and assert yourself within the context of a treatment team
  • Developing a nutrition prescription and food plan
  • Dealing with co-occurring medical and mental health diagnoses
  • Food exposures
  • Body Image
  • Metabolism
  • Exercise
  • And so much more!

Don’t have time to watch all 5 training videos sequentially? No problem--you can also pick one specific topic you want to focus on, rather than purchasing the entire series. You can also choose whether you want to rent or buy each video for future reference.

My hope is that you will find the training as helpful as the other dietitians who have already taken my online and live courses. My goal is that you walk away feeling more confident, more capable, and more empowered to treat people suffering from eating disorders.

You can learn more about my online training by visiting my site: https://marcird.pivotshare.com/
 

Spring Peanut Pad Thai

  • posted by Marci Anderson Evans
  • Tuesday, April 26, 2016

I LOVE Thai food. It's perhaps my favorite cuisine and almost always sounds delicious. While thumbing through my Food and Nutrition Magazine I came across a Spring-inspired homemade version of Pad Thai. As my readers know, I don't like to spend loads of time in the kitchen. But this recipe sounded easy enough plus it looked yummy and like it would make enough for leftovers.

Photo Source  // Photo by Scott Payne // Food Styling by Susan Skoog

Holy crap. It was AWESOME. Like, lick the plate kind of awesome. It was developed by a fellow dietitian Alexandra Caspero. You can check out her website Delicious Knowledge for super yummy recipes. She has a really beautiful website packed with easy to follow recipes that are brimming with flavor and nutrition. Her recipes are all vegetarian and vegan which to be honest, isn't my typical go-to. But something to bear in mind if you browse her site.

So here is my latest and favorite spring time recipe. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. If cooking up Pad Thai from scratch just feels a bit overwhelming, try ordering your favorite take-out version and add some roasted asparagus and Spring peas!

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces flat rice noodles (brown rice preferred)
  • ¼ cup low-sodium creamy peanut butter
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons (45 milliliters) rice vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons (45 milliliters) reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon (15 milliliters) sesame oil
  • ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • ¼ cup (60 milliliters) hot water
  • 1 tablespoon (15 milliliters) canola oil
  • ⅓ cup scallions, chopped, including white and green parts
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 8 ounces trimmed asparagus, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 1 large lime, juiced (about 2 tablespoons / 30 milliliters juice)
  • ½ cup roasted peanuts, lightly salted, roughly chopped
  • ¼ cup cilantro, chopped

Directions

  • Prepare rice noodles according to package instructions. Pour noodles into a colander and let drain.
  • Meanwhile, make sauce by whisking peanut butter, ginger, garlic, brown sugar, rice vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil and crushed red pepper flakes in a medium bowl.
  • Slowly whisk in hot water and stir until sauce is blended. Set aside.
  • In a large wok, heat canola oil over medium heat. Add scallions and cook until fragrant, about 1 to 2 minutes. Add garlic and cook for 30 seconds. Pour in eggs and stir to scramble for about 2 minutes or until soft. Add asparagus and peas and cook for 3 to 5 minutes, stirring often, until asparagus is tender.
  • Add drained noodles and sauce and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, tossing until the liquid has been absorbed. Stir in lime juice.
  • Transfer cooked noodles and vegetables to a large platter or bowl and garnish with peanuts and cilantro. Serve immediately. Serves 6.

 

 

 

Cooking Note

This dish comes together quickly, so be sure to chop and prep all ingredients before cooking.