5 Week Mindful Eating Meal Support Series

  • posted by Marci Evans
  • Thursday, January 12, 2017


    Is working on your relationship with food a part of your goals for 2017?

    Marci RD Nutrition is offering a 5-week meal support series with

    eating disorder and Intuitive Eating expert Sarah Patten. Details below!

     

    Who should consider participating?

    Anyone actively working on their eating disorder recovery as well as those focused on improving their relationship with food, re-learning their body's hunger and fullness cues, and developing self-trust around consuming challenging or “forbidden” foods. Participants must be appropriate for an outpatient level of care and must be working with an individual therapist and dietitian.

    Groups will be led by Sarah Patten, a registered dietitian, eating disorder expert, and Intuitive Eating specialist with Marci RD Nutrition.

    What we offer:

    A five-week meal support series focused on consuming adequate and challenging meals in a supportive group environment.

    Our first group will consist of introductions, an orientation to the keys of effective exposures, as well as personalized goal setting. YOU decide how to best utilize exposures in the groups to follow. The remaining four weeks will consist of mindfulness based eating exercises, dining together as a group, and post-meal processing.

    When will the group be held?

    Tuesday evenings from 7-8:15pm; 1/24, 1/31, 2/7, 2/21 and 2/28 (we will skip Tuesday, 2/14)

    Where we will meet:

    Marci RD Nutrition Counseling Office

    22 Hilliard St., Cambridge, MA 02138

    1st floor, door on the right

    Why join our group?

    Exposure to challenging meals in a supportive environment fosters greater self-trust while decreasing fear and anxiety over time. Food avoidance is a big risk factor for relapse and can hold one back from making peace with food once and for all. This group will help you to become more confident in your ability to feed yourself in an adequate, varied, and enjoyable way.

    Cost:

    $225 total ($45/group x5 weeks)

     

    In addition to the weekly support from Sarah and the other group members, you will leave this group with a toolbox of resources to take with you!

    Important registration information:

    Group size is limited to 6 participants. Contact Sarah at Sarah@MarciRD.com to reserve your spot. Your spot will be officially reserved once payment is received in full. Registering for the full series is required. We will not accept partial registration.

     

 

 

Healing the Hate: A Better Body Image in the New Year

  • posted by Marci Evans
  • Tuesday, January 10, 2017

 

I originally wrote this video blog for Recovery Warriors which is a phenomenal community and resource for anyone looking for additional support in their eating disorder recovery. But you don't have to have an eating disorder to have crappy body image. So if you'd like to feel better about your body, this one's for you.

Key Point: You cannot talk your way to better body image. If you treat yourself with hate you will continue to feel hate towards your body. In this video blog I share with you the why and the how to improve your body image through actionable steps.

After you view this video blog, I hope you will share what you plan to start doing that feels good to your body. What action step or steps will you start making today?


Resolutions: Making change a reality

  • posted by Marci Evans
  • Wednesday, December 28, 2016


I'm in the business of helping people make positive change in their lives. And I know how hard change can be.  So it wasn't surprising to hear my friend say "I refuse to make resolutions. Every year I make them and forget all about my good intentions until December."


Sound familiar? Making resolutions is a popular topic, since it's what we are "supposed" to be doing this time of year. Dreaming up what we want to do better than the year before seems to be an obligation at the end of December.

Let's face it, change is hard. We humans are wired to repeat habituated patterns. BUT, thanks to neuroscience we know that our brains are plastic!  That means we are capable of changing.  So if you want to see yourself accomplishing something specific this year, I don't think it matters if you call it a resolution or a goal. You just need a plan to support your efforts.

I see positive change happen on a daily basis. My clients who suffer from an eating disorder do some of the toughest and most amazing change work I have ever witnessed. So the ability we have as humans to progress and become healthier, happier, and better is something I believe in!

So here are 6 things I learned to make change stick.

1.Dream big but start small.  Choose 1 very very specific thing to work on. When you get good at that one thing, move on to the next.
2. Chart your plan. Once you identify that one small step, think through all the logistical details you need to make it a reality.
3. Be vocal. Let your family and friends know your intentions and how you'd like them to support your efforts.
4. Get support. If you are feeling stuck you may want to consider finding a coach, counselor, therapist, or dietitian.
5. Don't give up! It's hard work re-wiring our brains to stick to new habits. It's consistency that wins the race so stick with it.
6. Reward positive behavior (that helps reinforce those new neural pathways) but not with food!

Wishing you a health, happy, and safe New Year.


Healthy Selfishness

  • posted by Marci Evans
  • Friday, December 23, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Credit: I discovered this photo from my friend and colleague Leslie Schilling's facebook post. Check out her blog- you'll love her sensible and sassy nutrition expertise.

 
This time of year is all about giving. So I thought I’d be a little subversive and talk about taking. This post is all about healthy selfishness. What is healthy selfishness you ask? Well, it’s a term I made up. And I think the term is both awesome and useful. Yes, we have all heard the whole airline analogy- in case of an emergency you have to put your oxygen mask on before your child’s. But it’s so much more than that!

Health selfishness is about becoming clear on what you need, owning what you need whenever possible, and not apologizing for it. In essence, it’s about becoming attuned to your own sense of what is right for you . And the really amazing thing is that when you are attuned and responsive to your own needs, your capacity to give to others grows.

It may be helpful for us to break this down into categories. And when you are a tad OCD like me, breaking things down into categories always feels like the right thing to do! Let’s think about your wellness in three areas: physical, mental, emotional. You can imagine them like a Venn diagram because they are separate but have areas of overlap.

In order for you to become more clear about ways you need a little more healthy selfishness in your life, consider answering the following questions:
1. When it comes to my physical, mental, or emotional health what do I need more/less of?
2. What would it require for me to get more/less of that thing?
3. Am I willing to take what it requires?
4. If I have trouble justifying it for myself, would I think it seemed reasonable for someone else?

I’ll share with you one example but this type of “taking stock” can work in any area of your life. I’ll stick with food and eating since that’s what I know best!

1. I need to take 20 min and eat a balanced lunch during the day.
2. When I’m swamped at work, it may require keeping a co-worker waiting. At home, it may require me taking a break from paying attention to my kids.
3. Hmm, I’m not sure if it’s worth it. If I stop and eat I may feel like I’m losing time but there is a chance that having brain fuel will actually allow me to be more productive at work and may also prevent the frenetic snacking that happens in the late afternoon. I’ll try it out once this week so I can better assess the pros and cons of taking more time for myself.
4. Yes, I think it would be reasonable for pretty much anyone to stop for 20 min during the day and eat.

Happy Holidays and cheers to more healthy selfishness in each of your lives.
 
**Note if you are reading this and currently suffering with an eating disorder, your capacity to sense your own needs may be a very difficult task. In fact, the very act of recovering from an eating disorder is learning of how to listen and effectively respond to your inner needs and requires the support and expertise of a treatment team. If you are a research nerd like me, you may be interested in checking out this article entitled “Body self: development, psychopathologies, and psychoanalytic significance.”

Holiday Bill of Rights

  • posted by Marci Evans
  • Wednesday, December 07, 2016


There seems to be a pretty consistent theme that I'm discussing with all of my clients...the holidays.  There are so many wonderful things about the holiday season.  But let's be honest, it's also a stressful time of year. And if you're struggling with food and feelings about your weight, it can all feel a bit overwhelming.


But rather than thinking about what you should/should not eat, can/cannot have, consider the Intuitive Eater's Holiday Bill of Rights.  What do you need to feel peace about food and your body during the holidays?  Take some time to think about that question for yourself.


Marci's Holiday Bill of Rights:
  • I claim the right to enjoy the foods I love and pass on the things I don't
  • I claim the right to sleep for more than 8 hours while on vacation 
  • I claim the right to take a break from family time in order to exercise, read, or do what I need to feel good
  • I claim the right to laugh....a lot, which is always the best form of therapy. :)

I'm eager to hear what you're health "rights" are during the holidays.