Spring Peanut Pad Thai

  • posted by Marci Anderson Evans
  • Tuesday, April 26, 2016

I LOVE Thai food. It's perhaps my favorite cuisine and almost always sounds delicious. While thumbing through my Food and Nutrition Magazine I came across a Spring-inspired homemade version of Pad Thai. As my readers know, I don't like to spend loads of time in the kitchen. But this recipe sounded easy enough plus it looked yummy and like it would make enough for leftovers.

Photo Source  // Photo by Scott Payne // Food Styling by Susan Skoog

Holy crap. It was AWESOME. Like, lick the plate kind of awesome. It was developed by a fellow dietitian Alexandra Caspero. You can check out her website Delicious Knowledge for super yummy recipes. She has a really beautiful website packed with easy to follow recipes that are brimming with flavor and nutrition. Her recipes are all vegetarian and vegan which to be honest, isn't my typical go-to. But something to bear in mind if you browse her site.

So here is my latest and favorite spring time recipe. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. If cooking up Pad Thai from scratch just feels a bit overwhelming, try ordering your favorite take-out version and add some roasted asparagus and Spring peas!

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces flat rice noodles (brown rice preferred)
  • ¼ cup low-sodium creamy peanut butter
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons (45 milliliters) rice vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons (45 milliliters) reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon (15 milliliters) sesame oil
  • ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • ¼ cup (60 milliliters) hot water
  • 1 tablespoon (15 milliliters) canola oil
  • ⅓ cup scallions, chopped, including white and green parts
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 8 ounces trimmed asparagus, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 1 large lime, juiced (about 2 tablespoons / 30 milliliters juice)
  • ½ cup roasted peanuts, lightly salted, roughly chopped
  • ¼ cup cilantro, chopped

Directions

  • Prepare rice noodles according to package instructions. Pour noodles into a colander and let drain.
  • Meanwhile, make sauce by whisking peanut butter, ginger, garlic, brown sugar, rice vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil and crushed red pepper flakes in a medium bowl.
  • Slowly whisk in hot water and stir until sauce is blended. Set aside.
  • In a large wok, heat canola oil over medium heat. Add scallions and cook until fragrant, about 1 to 2 minutes. Add garlic and cook for 30 seconds. Pour in eggs and stir to scramble for about 2 minutes or until soft. Add asparagus and peas and cook for 3 to 5 minutes, stirring often, until asparagus is tender.
  • Add drained noodles and sauce and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, tossing until the liquid has been absorbed. Stir in lime juice.
  • Transfer cooked noodles and vegetables to a large platter or bowl and garnish with peanuts and cilantro. Serve immediately. Serves 6.

 

 

 

Cooking Note

This dish comes together quickly, so be sure to chop and prep all ingredients before cooking.


Help! I Am Addicted to Food

  • posted by Marci Anderson Evans
  • Tuesday, March 01, 2016

 

I have blogged about food addiction before. You can read previous posts here and here. But I recently had the opportunity to serve as a guest on my colleague and friend Julie Duffy Dillon's Love, Food Podcast. (If you haven't already subscribed, I totally encourage you to do so!) 

In this episode, Julie and I tease through a letter written by a woman who feels completely controlled by food and wonders if she is in fact a food addict. Together we talk about the current state of food addiction research and provide this writer with some practical tips. I think you'll like it! 

Here is a link to the episode. But you can also access it on your phone through iTunes, Stitcher, or wherever you typically get your podcasts. Please tune in and let me know what you liked or didn't like!

National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2016 & Sarah Patten

  • posted by Marci Anderson Evans
  • Saturday, February 27, 2016

Sarah Patten is a passionate eating disorder specialist who works with me in my practice. She is going to close out National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2016 by sharing with each of you "The One Thing She Wishes People Knew About Eating Disorders." Take it away Sarah!

Picture Source

Typically, when a person finds out that I'm a dietitian, I'm instantly assaulted with a barrage of questions regarding nutrition, the latest diet fads or super foods, and what my job actually entails day to day. When they learn that I don't endorse diets, food fads, or even promote weight loss and instead work with those struggling with eating disorders or disordered eating, the questions continue - but take on a different tone of curiosity and misunderstanding.

It never ceases to amaze me that eating disorders, which effect roughly 30 million Americans and have the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric illness, remain so mysterious to the general population. There is so much information that I wish I could convey to the world about eating disorders. So much insight and understanding that might foster greater compassion for those struggling and perhaps even increase the minimal research funding allotted to fighting this serious condition. My mind overflows with misconceptions I could correct or statistics I could offer to help educate, but when asked to consider the ONE thing that I wish people knew about eating disorders, the answer is simple:

A PERSON'S BODY SIZE IS NOT AN ACCURATE REFLECTION OF WHETHER THEY HAVE AN EATING DISORDER OR NOT!!!

Eating disorders are not limited to society's perception of the anorectic body type – but instead are rampant in people of all shapes and sizes. And although weight loss and a malnourished appearance can definitely be a serious indicator of an eating disorder, weight is by no means the only measure of the extent to which a person is suffering. For those struggling with an eating disorder, the reinforcement of this narrow belief contributes to feelings of “not being sick enough/thin enough/starved enough” or beliefs that “I don't have an eating disorder if I'm not “underweight” or emaciated.”

How can this knowledge help us? For starters, it can help us to be aware that we simply can't make assumptions about a person's relationship with food based on their body size. With this knowledge, we can work towards changing the way we might comment on another person's body, whether to their face or behind their back. Be mindful that your seemingly innocent comment on a coworker's weight loss may actually be interpreted very differently than you intended. Let's compliment other's on their strengths, praise their contributions, and appreciate their personality rather than focus on what their body looks like.

For those struggling with an eating disorder, hopefully this message will help you to challenge that internal critic telling you that you're not “sick enough” or “worthy of help or support” because of what your body looks like or what the scale says. Your weight in no way reflects your worth and certainly doesn't dictate your need for support. Healing from an eating disorder means learning to love, accept, and most importantly CARE for yourself no matter what your body looks like – you're worth it.

#5- Recovery is Possible

  • posted by Marci Anderson Evans
  • Friday, February 26, 2016

A client in recovery wishes you knew:

I never really believed in the concept of recovery. And while I’m not fully recovered, I’m so much further along than I ever dreamed possible. And while it’s been tough, my life is so much better without the clutches of my ED. I’m starting to believe that full recovery is possible. But if that scares you, hold on to the idea of getting “just a little bit better.”

Julie Duffy Dillon wishes you knew:

Recovery is possible for you. No matter how long you've been in throws of ED, no matter how tough it gets, no matter how dark it is, I believe in your recovery. I believe eating disorder behaviors deprive the brain of the nourishment it needs to feel hope and blocks the path to recovery. My job, as your dietitian, is to let you know I have plenty of hope for your recovery in my noggin. Your team believes this too and we will patiently walk beside you as you find your secure footing to recovery.

Julie Duffy Dillon  MS, RD, NCC, LDN, CEDRD

 

http://www.juliedillonrd.com/

Registered Dietitian, Speaker, Writer
Eating Disorder Specialist
Owner, BirdHouse Nutrition Therapy
Nourishing the hope to heal (TM)

 

 

#4- Societal & Cultural Norms Fuel the Fire

  • posted by Marci Anderson Evans
  • Thursday, February 25, 2016

A client in recovery wishes you knew:

There are so many things that I wish people knew about EDs - and primarily because people don’t talk about them as much as they should given their prevalence and our society’s warped perspective on women’s bodies. No one who has an eating disorder wants it; they affect people of all ages and genders and backgrounds and races and cultures and - anyone; saying “just eat more” isn’t going to do anyone any good; it’s more important to listen to someone who has an ED often more often than talking to them. The list goes on and on. What’s important is to know that there is so much to learn about and to stay open to and to gather support for, because the more you know and the more they know, the better off you all will be.

Emily Fonnesbeck wishes you knew:

That they aren’t glamorous, although it’s easy to assume in a culture of clean eating, fitspiration,filters and photoshopping. When our bodies are our primary focus, we can miss emotional distress that can lead to mental illness. That isn’t anything to take lightly; eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness. While the causes and triggers for eating disorders are multiple and varied, they often start as innocently as trying a diet (yes even so-called “healthy diets”; a true oxymoron). I wish people realized the possible triggering that can result from viewing or listening to YOUR before/after pictures, gym selfies and dieting tips. If you are the one triggered, get rid of it. Be careful about the type of media messages you let into your mind, heart and soul. While it may not be culturally acceptable, please know that you absolutely, positively get to say NO.

It seems that in terms of health and fitness, a common belief is that strength and self-improvement comes from eating a certain way, sticking to a diet or pushing through the pain in exercise. I don’t believe it. I feel true strength and self-improvement comes from being true to yourself and respecting yourself enough to avoid the demoralizing world of weight, body shape and diet obsession. Anyone can (and deserves to) find peace with food, their body and themselves.

Emily Fonnesbeck RD, CD

emilyfonnesbeck.com

https://www.facebook.com/EmilyFonnesbeckRD

http://pinterest.com/emilyfonnesbeck

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Helping you make peace with food to end disordered eating.